Sandia National Laboratories – Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory – Wave Energy Converter Emulation

Capabilities include:

  • Wave energy converter emulator (WEC-Sim Compatible)
  • Power Hardware-in-the-Loop platform
  • Wave and energy storage grid integration
  • Real-Time simulation (Opal-RT compatible)
  • Wave energy converter interactions with energy storage
  • Microgrid research
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Description

The Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory (DETL) is a state-of-the-art hardware testing research facility to study grid integration of energy technology such as Photovoltaic (PV) inverters, Wind Turbine Generators (WTGs), energy storage system (ESS), and wave energy converters (WEC). DETL is a multipurpose research facility designed to integrate emerging energy technologies into new and existing electricity infrastructure to accommodate the nation’s increasing demand for clean, secure, and reliable energy. The laboratory is highly configurable, it allows researchers to evaluate distributed energy resources (DER) and controllers such as inverters and other power electronics equipment under a wide range of conditions including irradiance variability, power levels and voltage and frequency regulation functionality in both grid-connected and microgrid configurations. Testing capabilities include scaled portions of utility feeders and the transmission infrastructure through Power Hardware-in-the-Loop capabilities (including an OPAL-RT 5600 simulation platform).

A regenerative power converter is designed to perform the power conditioning for the power provided by a generator. For the Power Hardware-in-the-Loop experiments, the regenerative power converter serves as the device under test for the wave energy converter emulator platform. For the mechanical component of the wave energy converter emulator, two 20 hp 1,765 RPM three-phase ECP2334T Baldor motors/generator are used. A non-regenerative motor drive is used to control the torque input motor which is programmed to emulate the torque effects that the wave might have on the wave energy converter emulator shaft. A wave profile and a simplified inertial model of the WEC are used to send the appropriate control signal to the motor via the motor drive.

Capabilities include:

  • Wave energy converter emulator (WEC-Sim Compatible)
  • Power Hardware-in-the-Loop platform
  • Wave and energy storage grid integration
  • Real-Time simulation (Opal-RT compatible)
  • Wave energy converter interactions with energy storage
  • Microgrid research

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Point of Contact: Rachid Darbali-Zamora – rdarbal@sandia.gov