Tank, Flume, Tunnel & Basin Testing

Click on this link to download a list of all the following facilities.

Wave Tanks

Oregon State University – Directional Wave Basin

The Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory, established in 1972, is a state-of-the-art Center conducting both applied and fundamental research to address ocean, coastal and nearshore processes via physical model experiments. Hinsdale makes learning and discovery possible. With two large-scale experimental facilities, investigators are able to perform physical model testing of coastal systems subject to the action of tsunamis, waves, and/or storm surge. A large variety of projects have been carried out at the Laboratory including wave propagation, wave-structure interaction, stability of coastal structures, beach erosion, offshore structures, bio-fouling, floating structures, and testing of renewable energy devices. More info at, http://wave.oregonstate.edu

Point of Contact: Pedro Lomonaco - pedro.lomonaco@oregonstate.edu

Length: 48.8m

Width: 26.5m

Height: 2.13m

Max depth: 1.5m

Expertise Keywords: Indoor wave tank or basin testing, Indoor wave flume testing

Sandia National Laboratory – Lake Facility

Located near the SWEPT facility and the SNL WP offices, this small lake facility (oversized outdoor tank) can be used to perform shakedown tests of WEC systems including mooring systems. Otherwise known as the Water Impact Facility located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the lake facility provides a controlled environment for high-velocity water impact testing, gravity-assisted drop testing and underwater testing. A 300-foot drop tower stands next to a 120-foot-wide by 188-foot-long by 50-foot-deep lake. A total depth of 80 feet for underwater testing can be obtained via a 6-foot-diameter, 30-foot-long steel pipe at the bottom of the lake.

Point of Contact: Giorgio Bacelli - gbacell@sandia.gov 

Length: 55m

Width: 36.5

Height: 15.25m

Max depth: 24.25m

Expertise Keywords: Component and Power testing, Test Environments, Field/open water lake testing, General component testing, Outdoor wave tank or basin testing, Structural testing

Stevens Institute – Davidson Laboratory

The Davidson Laboratory, founded in 1935, is one of the largest and most renowned hydrodynamic and ocean engineering research facilities in the US. Pioneering marine hydrodynamic studies in both physical modeling and computer simulation of marine craft designs (ranging from high-speed planing boats to submarines) have contributed to the Laboratory’s international reputation.

Point of Contact: Muhammad Hajj - mhajj@stevens.edu

Raju Datla - rdatla@stevens.edu

Length: 100m

Width: 5m

Height: 2.5m

Max depth: 2.2m

Expertise Keywords: Physical Modeling, Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP), Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, Dynamometer, Fluid-structure interaction modeling, Indoor wave tank or basin testing, Operational modeling, Power performance modeling, Power-take-off testing, Tow tank testing, WEC hydrodynamics

University of California, Berkeley - Physical Model Test Facility

Wave and towing tank. Unmanned carriage speed up to 4 m/s standard, higher speed achievable under limited conditions. One or two technicians available based on agreement. Advanced support: such as test design, advanced instrumentation or analysis optionally available - usually through research contract or collaboration. More info at, https://flow.berkeley.edu/physical-model-test-facility/

Point of Contact: Simo Makiharju - makiharju@berkeley.edu

Length: 67m

Width: 2.7

Height: 2m

Max depth: 2m depends on conditions targeted

Expertise Keywords: Indoor wave tank or basin testing

University of Iowa - Hydraulics Wave Basin

IIHR’s wave basin is 40-m long, 20-m wide, and 4.3-m deep with a water depth of 3 meters. The six plunger-type wave makers are at the east end of the wave basin and a 7.8x20-m2 wave beach is at the west end at an 11.3 tilt angle. Sidewall-wave dampers along the north/south basin walls are moved upwards/downwards during and between testing to shorten the time interval between tests. A dock and work platform above the wave beach are used for test setup. A 12-ton main carriage moves on a railway system in the x-direction (east-west); a 2 ton sub carriage moves on the rack-gear in the y-direction (south-north); and a turntable attached to the sub-carriage moves on the ring-gear in the turning direction in the xy-plane. The operator control panels for the carriage and wavemaker are on the second floor on the north side of the building. More info at, https://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/facilities/annexes-labs-and-shops/hydraulics-wave-basin-facility/

Point of Contact: Troy Lyons - troy-lyons@uiowa.edu

Length: 40m

Width: 20m

Max depth: 4.3m

Expertise Keywords: Indoor wave tank or basin testing, Indoor wave flume testing

University of Maine Advanced Structures & Composites Center

The University of Maine’s Advanced Structures and Composites Center is a world-leading, interdisciplinary center for research, education, and economic development encompassing material sciences, manufacturing, and the engineering of composites and structures. The Center is housed in a 100,000 ft2 ISO 17025-accredited testing laboratory with more than 220 personnel. The center provides R&D services to support a variety of applications including renewables, infrastructure, defense, marine, aerospace, and building industries. The center has unique facilities including: a 100ftx30ftx15ft deep wave/ tow tank with a rotatable wind tunnel, small and large scale structural testing for prototype evaluation, manufacturing capabilities including the world’s largest 3d printer, 5 axis CNC, welding, and composite production, and advanced numerical modeling and design software. The center has significant experience in offshore structure design, hydrodynamics, aerodynamics, model testing, and technology development with academic and industrial partners.

Point of Contact: Anthony M. Viselli - anthony.viselli@maine.edu

Length: 30m

Width:9m

Height: 5m

Max depth:  5m

Expertise Keywords:

Technical design. Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP), Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADV), Control Systems engineering support, Finite element analysis (FEA) modeling, Fluid-structure interaction modeling, General component testing, Generator testing, IEC technical specification design, Indoor wave tank or basin testing, Mooring dynamics simulation, Structural testing, Tidal flow testing plan design, Tow tank testing, Turbine hydrodynamics, WEC hydrodynamics,Wave, bathymetry and site data analysis, Wind-water interactions testing

University of Michigan - The Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory

The Aaron Friedman Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory is a suite of labs and facilities that engage in classic naval architecture experiments, such as calm water resistance, seakeeping, and propeller tests. The MHL supports education and research for the Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering at the University of Michigan. It is a highly flexible facility that hosts a variety of specialized testing programs for researchers at the University of Michigan, Industry, and Government Agencies. The staff provides technical guidance and support in experiment design, instrumentation used, and conducting the experimental tests. The MHL also conducts fundamental research in areas of current interest such as hull form drag reduction and planing hull and surface effect ship dynamics, renewable ocean energy harvests, advanced material marine propulsors, and control surfaces.

The MHL is home to a suite of facilities. The Physical Modeling Basin (towing tank) which is equipped with a manned bridge carriage and unmanned trailer with speed capabilities of 0.08 to 6.10 m/s, an electrically driven, computerized wedge-type wavemaker that is capable of generating regular waves and irregular waves. A Wind-Wave Tank has both wind driven and plunging wedge wave capabilities. The Recirculating Cavitation Channel is a 1:14 scale model of the U.S. Navy’s Large Cavitation Channel (LCC). The Parallel Flow Mixing Loop includes two vertical laminar and turbulent single and two-phase flows. Also on-site are the Machine, Electrical and Modeling shops which are available for the construction and fabrication of models, instrumentation, specialized experimental and testing equipment, and prototyping. More info at, https://mhl.engin.umich.edu/

Point of Contact: James Gose - jgose@umich.edu

Kevin Maki - kjmaki@umich.edu

Length: 109.7m

Width: 6.7m

Height: 6.35m from water to ceiling

Max depth: 3.5m

Expertise Keywords: Physical Modeling, Dynamometer, Indoor water channel or flume testing, Indoor wave flume testing, Tow tank testing, Wind-water interactions testing, Wind Wave Tank, Parallel flow mixing loop, Recirculating Cavitation Channel

University of New Hampshire - UNH Tow and Wave Tank

The UNH Tow and Wave Tank enables research where test bodies can be towed, subjected to wave action, or both. It is 3.66 m wide, 2.44 m deep, and 36.6m long. The tow carriage can achieve tow speeds up to 2 m/s for turbine testing and the tow system provides highly accurate control of acceleration, velocity and position. A low-drag hydrokinetic turbine test bed with a submerged frame made from NACA 0020 struts is used to test turbines up to nominally 1m diameter for both cross-flow and axial-flow turbines, enabling high Reynolds number testing at reasonable blockage. The wave maker can generate waves with 1-5 s periods up to 0.4 m wave height (regular waves, various random seas spectra), and the tank is equipped with a wave-energy-absorbing geo-textile beach. More info at, https://marine.unh.edu/research-centers/facilities/jere-chase-ocean-engineering-laboratory

Point of Contact: John Ahern - John.Ahern@unh.edu

Length: 36.6m

Width: 3.66m

Height: 3m

Max depth: 2.44m

Expertise Keywords:Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP), Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADV), General component testing, IEC technical specification design, Indoor water channel or flume testing, Indoor wave flume testing, Indoor wave tank or basin testing, Performance metrics analysis, Tidal flow testing plan design, Tow tank testing, Turbine hydrodynamics, Turbine test platform, WEC hydrodynamics,  Array Integration

University of New Hampshire Engineering Tank

The Engineering Tank at COEL measures 18.3 m (L) x 12.2 m (W) x 6.1 m (D) (360,000 gallons of water) and is used for a variety of experiments where simulating unobstructed, open water environments is required. Cranes for deploying heavy equipment, including a 2-ton wall-cantilevered jib crane and a large 6-ton gantry crane are available. The tank is used for wet-testing of all types of marine renewable energy devices, ocean observing buoys, autonomous underwater or surface vehicles, and for evaluating deployment and operational strategies. Several additional components offer a variety of testing platforms. For example, the tank is well-equipped for standard acoustic measurements of hydrophones, projectors, and sonar systems (transducer impedance, receive sensitivity, transmitting voltage response, source level, and beam patterns). A variety of sub-bottom profiler transducers, single- and split-beam echo sounders, and multibeam echo sounders have been tested and calibrated in this facility. More info at, https://marine.unh.edu/research-centers/facilities/jere-chase-ocean-engineering-laboratory

Point of Contact: John Ahern - John.Ahern@unh.edu

Length: 18.3m

Width: 12.2m

Height: 6.4m

Max depth: 6.1m

Expertise Keywords:Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP), Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADV), General component testing, IEC technical specification design, Indoor water channel or flume testing, Indoor wave flume testing, Indoor wave tank or basin testing, Performance metrics analysis, Tidal flow testing plan design, Tow tank testing, Turbine hydrodynamics, Turbine test platform, WEC hydrodynamics,  Array Integration

University of Washington

The UW School of Oceanography's test tank is a 23,283 gallon, room-temperature salt water tank covered by 9 large heavy lids that allow for forklift traffic across the top. Access to the tank is achieved by lifting off each lid with a 5 ton overhead hoist. The hoist can also be used for loading and unloading equipment in the large indoor staging area. Viewing the inside of the tank from below is possible from 8 large windows accessible through the basement.

Point of Contact:  Cassie Riel - criel@uw.edu

Length: 7.3m

Width: 3m

Height: 3.6m

Max depth: 3.6m

Expertise Keywords: General component testing

Flumes

Florida Atlantic University Hydrodynamics Laboratory

FAU's Hydrodynamics Laboratory houses a wave/towing/flume tank and a low-turbulence water tunnel. The laboratory is equipped with optics, cameras, load cells and flow measurement equipment.

A glass-walled wave/towing/flume (18.3 x 1.2 x 1.2 m) can also be used to generate waves, and for towing physical models. The flow in the flume can obtain velocities up to 0.5 m/s. In addition, the towing carrier can reach a velocity of 1.0 m/s.

A recirculating water tunnel (2.5 x .25 x .25 m) was specially constructed for PIV measurements and flow visualization. The test section has sides and bottom walls made of glass, an optical table as a base, vibration-damping supports and aluminum railings to facilitate the mounting of optical and experimental equipment.

Point of Contact: Oscar Curet - ocuret@fau.edu

Length: 18m

Width: 1.2m

Height: 1.2m

Max depth: 1.5m

Expertise Keywords: Indoor water channel or flume testing, Tow tank testing

Oregon State University – Large Wave Flume

The Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory, established in 1972, is a state-of-the-art Center conducting both applied and fundamental research to address ocean, coastal and nearshore processes via physical model experiments. Hinsdale makes learning and discovery possible. With two large-scale experimental facilities, investigators are able to perform physical model testing of coastal systems subject to the action of tsunamis, waves, and/or storm surge. A large variety of projects have been carried out at the Laboratory including wave propagation, wave-structure interaction, stability of coastal structures, beach erosion, offshore structures, bio-fouling, floating structures, and testing of renewable energy devices. More info at, http://wave.oregonstate.edu

Point of Contact: Pedro Lomonaco - pedro.lomonaco@oregonstate.edu

Large Wave Flume

Length: 104m

Width: 3.7m

Height: 4.6m

Max depth: 2.7m

Expertise Keywords: Indoor wave flume testing

The University of Iowa – Hydraulics Towing Tank

Located in the lower level of C. Maxwell Stanley Hydraulics Lab, the IIHR towing tank has provided researchers with more than 50 years of experimental data. When noted researcher Lou Landweber left the David Taylor Model Basin (DTMB) and joined IIHR in the mid-1950s, he helped build IIHR into one of the nation’s leading ship hydrodynamics research programs. Researchers here have focused mainly on ship hydrodynamics, with an emphasis on free-surface flows as they relate to resistance and propulsion. However, present towing tank work focuses on seakeeping and maneuvering problems, as the traditionally separate areas of resistance and propulsion, seakeeping, and maneuvering begin to merge and CFD methods improve and are able to handle increasingly complex ship hydrodynamics problems. More info at, https://www.iihr.uiowa.edu/research/instrumentation-and-technology/ship-hydrodynamics-resources/

Point of Contact: Troy Lyons - troy-lyons@uiowa.edu

Length: 100m

Width: 3m

Width: 26.5

Height: 3.5m

Max depth: 3m

Expertise Keywords: Indoor wave tank or basin testing, Indoor wave flume testing

University of Washington - Harris Hydraulics: WASIRF

The Washington Air-Sea Interaction Research Facility (WASIRF) is a wind-wave-current tank facility formerly located at the NASA Wallops Island Flight Facility. WASIRF is a laboratory testing tank designed to investigate wind-wave-current interactions. The head space above for air flow measures 0.45 m.  The maximum wind speed is 10 m/s and the maximum water current in both directions is 0.30 m s-1 with the full working depth and 0.51 m s-1 with a working depth of 0.45 m using a false bottom.  An electronically controlled linear actuator at one end of the tank can generate any wave frequency or pattern up to 10 Hz. The computer control of wind, current, and hydraulic wave generating units can accurately repeat unsteady phenomena to allow its statistical study, as well as automate the facility operation. The water within the facility can be heated and maintained at warm temperatures, while the air flow can be cooled and humidity controlled at cool temperatures.

Point of Contact: Cassie Riel - criel@uw.edu

Length: 12m

Width: 0.91m

Height: 1.22m

Max depth: 0.75m

Expertise Keywords: Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADV), Indoor water channel or flume testing, Indoor wave flume testing, Wind-water interactions testing

University of Washington - Harris Hydraulics: Alice C. Tyler Flume

The Alice C. Tyler flume is a free-surface water channel with independent control of flow speed, water depth, and water temperature (10 – 35 oC). This allows the Reynolds and Froude numbers to be independently varied during turbine experiments. Turbulence intensity is relatively low (1-3%). The flume side walls and bottom are glass, providing optical access for flow diagnostics, including Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Using existing instrumentation and data acquisition, cross-flow turbine rotors and axial-flow turbine blades can be easily tested.

Point of Contact: Cassie Riel - criel@uw.edu

Length: 4.6m

Width: 0.76m

Height: 0.7m

Max depth: 0.6m

Expertise Keywords: Instrumentation, Test Environments, Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADV), Indoor water channel or flume testing, Turbine hydrodynamics, Turbine test platform